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19 items found

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  • Pair of nineteenth century faux-bamboo side chairs,

    £975 the pair Stock code: 79238
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    Pair of nineteenth century faux-bamboo side chairs,

    turned beechwood with caned seat panels, with cushions.
    Dimensions: 85cm (33½") High, 44cm (17¼") Wide, 46cm (18") Deep, Seat depth 38 cm
    Stock code: 79238
    £975 the pair
  • Pair of buttoned back Gainsborough chairs,

    £900 the pair Stock code: 79200
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    Pair of buttoned back Gainsborough chairs,

    with faux-leather upholstery and stained beechwood frame.
    Dimensions: 101.5cm (40") High, 70cm (27½") Wide, 80cm (31½") Deep, Seat depth 48 cm x 60.5 cm high
    Stock code: 79200
    £900 the pair
  • Windsor Chair

    An English yew and elm wood Windsor chair,

    £675 Stock code: 45697
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    An English yew and elm wood Windsor chair,

    with bent wood top-rail and arm rests, linked by a pierced splat and raised on spindles, the principle spindles turned and knopped, the legs similar and linked with crinoline stretchers,
    Dimensions: 90cm (35½") High, 57cm (22½") Wide, 50cm (19¾") Deep
    Stock code: 45697
    £675
  • Windsor Chair

    A mid Victorian oak and elm Windsor chair,

    £525 Stock code: 48965
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    A mid Victorian oak and elm Windsor chair,

    with bent wood top-rail and arm rests, linked by a pierced splat and raised on spindles, the principle spindles turned and knopped, the legs similar and linked with crinoline stretchers,
    Dimensions: 86cm (33¾") High, 52cm (20½") Wide, 53cm (20¾") Deep
    Stock code: 48965
    £525
  • Late nineteenth century Canadian piano stool,

    £450 Stock code: 78499
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    Late nineteenth century Canadian piano stool,

    turned hardwood with iron and glass ball and claw feet, height adjustable, stamped 'Thomas Woodstock Organ Co., Ont. Canada'.
    Dimensions: 49cm (19¼") High, 61.5cm (24¼") At Highest, 35.5cm (14") Wide
    Stock code: 78499
    £450
  • Windsor Chair

    A low mid Victorian oak, elm and ash Windsor chair,

    £425 Stock code: 48868
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    A low mid Victorian oak, elm and ash Windsor chair,

    with bent wood top-rail and arm rests, linked by a pierced splat  and raised on spindles, the legs linked with H-stretchers,
    Dimensions: 100cm (39¼") High, 50cm (19¾") Wide, 60cm (23½") Deep
    Stock code: 48868
    £425
  • Luba stool,

    £375 Stock code: AD1452
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    Luba stool,

    Luba art relates most commonly to the Kings and Chiefs of the Congolese Luba tribe, who would assert their power by display of ceremonial objects during ceremonies. Stools were considered to be the most important of these objects as they would serve not only as a seat but as a receptacle for the Chief’s spirit. The ruler is thus figuratively and literally supported by a caryatid figure - in this case a kneeling female ancestor. The carvings seen on her stomach allude to the maternal - such markings were common among many matrilineal societies in Africa to emphasise and protect the navel as the threshold between oneself, one’s mother and one’s own lineage.
    Dimensions: 41cm (16¼") High, 27cm (10¾") Wide
    Stock code: AD1452
    £375
  • Luba female / male stool,

    £375 Stock code: AD1451
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    Luba female / male stool,

    Luba art relates most commonly to the Kings and Chiefs of the Congolese Luba tribe, who would assert their power by display of ceremonial objects during ceremonies. Stools were considered to be the most important of these objects as they would serve not only as a seat but as a receptacle for the Chief’s spirit. The ruler is thus figuratively and literally supported by a caryatid figure - in this case both male and female standing figures. The male is seen with inset cowrie shell eyes, believed by many African tribes to contain divine powers.
    Dimensions: 41cm (16¼") High, 29cm (11½") Wide
    Stock code: AD1451
    £375
  • Luba stool

    £375 Stock code: AD1449
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    Luba stool

    Luba art relates most commonly to the Kings and Chiefs of the Congolese Luba tribe, who would assert their power by display of ceremonial objects during ceremonies. Stools were considered to be the most important of these objects as they would serve not only as a seat but as a receptacle for the Chief’s spirit. The ruler is thus figuratively and literally supported by a caryatid figure - in this case a standing female ancestor. The carvings seen on her stomach allude to the maternal - such markings were common among many matrilineal societies in Africa to emphasise and protect the navel as the threshold between oneself, one’s mother and one’s own lineage.
    Dimensions: 43cm (17") High, 28.5cm (11¼") Wide
    Stock code: AD1449
    £375
  • Luba stool,

    £350 Stock code: AD1453
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    Luba stool,

    Luba art relates most commonly to the Kings and Chiefs of the Congolese Luba tribe, who would assert their power by display of ceremonial objects during ceremonies. Stools were considered to be the most important of these objects as they would serve not only as a seat but as a receptacle for the Chief’s spirit. The ruler is thus figuratively and literally supported by a caryatid figure - in this case a kneeling female ancestor with elongated and outstretched fingertips. The deep carvings seen on her stomach allude to the maternal - such markings were common among many matrilineal societies in Africa to emphasise and protect the navel as the threshold between oneself, one’s mother and one’s own lineage.
    Dimensions: 45.5cm (18") High, 33cm (13") Wide
    Stock code: AD1453
    £350
  • Tabwa stool

    £350 Stock code: AD1444
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    Tabwa stool

    Congolese Tabwa art has distinct similarities to that of the Luba tribe, and its stools are used also in ceremonies by the Kings and Chiefs of the community with a means of establishing power and authority. The key difference seen between the two is the Tabwa’s traditional depiction of braided hair as a carved extension of the head and checkerboard-style scarification of the woman’s body.
    Dimensions: 44.5cm (17½") High, 29.5cm (11½") Wide
    Stock code: AD1444
    £350
  • Luba stool

    £325 Stock code: AD1450
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    Luba stool

    Luba art relates most commonly to the Kings and Chiefs of the Congolese Luba tribe, who would assert their power by display of ceremonial objects during ceremonies. Stools were considered to be the most important of these objects as they would serve not only as a seat but as a receptacle for the Chief’s spirit. The ruler is thus figuratively and literally supported by a caryatid figure - in this case a posed female ancestor with a carved headdress and jewellery.
    Dimensions: 38cm (15") High, 31cm (12¼") Wide
    Stock code: AD1450
    £325
  • Luba stool

    £325 Stock code: AD1448
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    Luba stool

    Luba art relates most commonly to the Kings and Chiefs of the Congolese Luba tribe, who would assert their power by display of ceremonial objects during ceremonies. Stools were considered to be the most important of these objects as they would serve not only as a seat but as a receptacle for the Chief’s spirit. The ruler is thus figuratively and literally supported by a caryatid figure - in this case a kneeling female ancestor adorned with beaded and carved jewellery. The deep carvings seen on her stomach allude to the maternal - such markings were common among many matrilineal societies in Africa to emphasise and protect the navel as the threshold between oneself, one’s mother and one’s own lineage. Damage to left hand.
    Dimensions: 41cm (16¼") High, 25.5cm (10") Wide
    Stock code: AD1448
    £325
  • Luba stool,

    £300 Stock code: AD1454
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    Luba stool,

    Luba art relates most commonly to the Kings and Chiefs of the Congolese Luba tribe, who would assert their power by display of ceremonial objects during ceremonies. Stools were considered to be the most important of these objects as they would serve not only as a seat but as a receptacle for the Chief’s spirit. The ruler is thus figuratively and literally supported by a caryatid figure - in this case a kneeling female ancestor with elongated and outstretched fingertips. The deep and patterned carvings seen on her stomach allude to the maternal - such markings were common among many matrilineal societies in Africa to emphasise and protect the navel as the threshold between oneself, one’s mother and one’s own lineage.
    Dimensions: 42cm (16½") High, 33cm (13") Wide
    Stock code: AD1454
    £300
  • Shoe shine chair

    £280 Stock code: 79197
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    Shoe shine chair

    The mahogany chair having a square raised padded back and tapered seat, padded arms, eight stretchers support the square tapered legs. A foot plate with non-slip tape to base. Mid twentieth century.
    Dimensions: 125.5cm (49½") High, 67cm (26½") Wide, 74.5cm (29¼") Deep
    Stock code: 79197
    £280
  • Shoe Shine Chair

    £280 Stock code: 79199
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    Shoe Shine Chair

    The mahogany chair having a square raised padded back and tapered seat, padded arms, eight stretchers support the square tapered legs. A foot plate to base. Mid twentieth century.
    Dimensions: 125cm (49¼") High, 67cm (26½") Wide, 71cm (28") Deep, Seat height 82 cm
    Stock code: 79199
    £280
  • Luba stool

    £275 Stock code: AD1447
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    Luba stool

    Luba art relates most commonly to the Kings and Chiefs of the Congolese Luba tribe, who would assert their power by display of ceremonial objects during ceremonies. Stools were considered to be the most important of these objects as they would serve not only as a seat but as a receptacle for the Chief’s spirit. The ruler is thus figuratively and literally supported by a caryatid figure - in this case a posed female ancestor with a carved headdress. The deep and patterned carvings seen on her stomach allude to the maternal - such markings were common among many matrilineal societies in Africa to emphasise and protect the navel as the threshold between oneself, one’s mother and one’s own lineage. The act of scarification will have often been used as a rite of passage, in order to symbolise a readiness for the pain of childbirth.
    Dimensions: 38cm (15") High, 23.5cm (9¼") Wide
    Stock code: AD1447
    £275
  • Tabwa stool

    £275 Stock code: AD1446
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    Tabwa stool

    Congolese Tabwa art has distinct similarities to that of the Luba tribe, and its stools are used also in ceremonies by the Kings and Chiefs of the community with a means of establishing power and authority. The key difference seen between the two is the Tabwa’s traditional depiction of braided hair as a carved extension of the head and checkerboard-style scarification of the woman’s body. Such markings were common among many matrilineal societies in Africa to emphasise and protect the navel as the threshold between oneself, one’s mother and one’s own lineage.
    Dimensions: 40cm (15¾") High, 22.5cm (8¾") Wide
    Stock code: AD1446
    £275
  • Shoe Shine Chair

    £250 Stock code: 79198
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    Shoe Shine Chair

    The hard wood frame made up of the shaped and padded concave back, leading to padded shaped arms and stuff over seat, supported on square legs, stretchers and foot plate. Mid twentieth century.
    Dimensions: 124cm (48¾") High, 67cm (26½") Wide, 62cm (24½") Deep
    Stock code: 79198
    £250

Featured Items

  • 18th Century French Engravings of Dogs

    £175 each Stock code: P01266 O
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    18th Century French Engravings of Dogs

    Published for, Histoire naturelle, générale et particulière (1749–1804), which was the first modern attempt to systematically present all existing knowledge in the fields of natural history, geology, and anthropology.
    Dimensions: 36cm (14¼") High, 31cm (12¼") Wide, 13cm (5") Deep
    Stock code: P01266 O
    £175 each
  • Portraits Part II by Constantin Guys, Verve Vol 2 / No. 5-6.

    £500 Stock code: P01275 E
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    Portraits Part II by Constantin Guys, Verve Vol 2 / No. 5-6.

    The Verve Review was a purposefully luxurious. It ran from 1937 to 1960, but with only 38 editions available, due to the high degree of design and editorial work dedicated to each issue. Each edition contained unique lithographic prints, commissioned by the editor, and each cover a double-page lithograph elaborated by one of the artists contained within. It was the brainchild of its editor Stratis Eleftheriades, a Greek National who moved to Paris in the early thirties to take part in the growing Modernist movement, writing under the name of Teriade.
    Dimensions: 51cm (20") High, 40cm (15¾") Wide, 2cm (0¾") Deep
    Stock code: P01275 E
    £500
  • Portrait Fragment by Pierre Bonnard, Verve Vol 2 / No. 5-6.

    £600 Stock code: P01275 I
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    Portrait Fragment by Pierre Bonnard, Verve Vol 2 / No. 5-6.

    The Verve Review was a purposefully luxurious. It ran from 1937 to 1960, but with only 38 editions available, due to the high degree of design and editorial work dedicated to each issue. Each edition contained unique lithographic prints, commissioned by the editor, and each cover a double-page lithograph elaborated by one of the artists contained within. It was the brainchild of its editor Stratis Eleftheriades, a Greek National who moved to Paris in the early thirties to take part in the growing Modernist movement, writing under the name of Teriade.
    Dimensions: 51cm (20") High, 40cm (15¾") Wide, 2cm (0¾") Deep
    Stock code: P01275 I
    £600
  • The Four Elements, Fire by Abraham Rattner, Verve Vol. 1 / No. 1.

    £600 Stock code: P01270 A
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    The Four Elements, Fire by Abraham Rattner, Verve Vol. 1 / No. 1.

    The Verve Review was a purposefully luxurious. It ran from 1937 to 1960, but with only 38 editions available, due to the high degree of design and editorial work dedicated to each issue. Each edition contained unique lithographic prints, commissioned by the editor, and each cover a double-page lithograph elaborated by one of the artists contained within. It was the brainchild of its editor Stratis Eleftheriades, a Greek National who moved to Paris in the early thirties to take part in the growing Modernist movement, writing under the name of Teriade.
    Dimensions: 51cm (20") High, 40cm (15¾") Wide, 2cm (0¾") Deep
    Stock code: P01270 A
    £600